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History Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for historians and history buffs. It only takes a minute to sign up. We found these two shell cases in my parents garage. The larger shell has a diameter of 85mm and the smaller shell is 62 mm. I hope the extra photos help. Thank you. The smaller of the two seems to be a British shell case.

Another useful guide is the treatise on Ammunition from the War Office. It looks like it may be a 6-pounder round. That had a calibre of 2. Another researcher that I'm working with this week believes that the "T" indicates that the shell was last filled at the Tipnor filling station and that the "95" is from the quality inspection carried out there.

The larger case would appear to be French. From the picture, this could be the case from a 75mm mle or French 75mm round. I'm less familiar with French ammunition, but the 17 probably means the shell was produced inso by extension, "10 17" would suggest October It's possible that the A.

RS stamp indicates that it was manufactured in Rennes Ateliers de construction de Rennes. EDIT : If the measurements added to the question are across the widest part of the base of the shells, then that is consistent with their identification as a British 6-pounder and French 75mm respectively. The encircled A means the shell has been fired once.

The two adjacent punch marks are given for each subsequent firing. So this shell has been fired 3 times.Log in Register. Search titles only. Search Filters. Forums New posts Search forums. Media Test New media New comments Search media. Reviews Latest reviews Search reviews.

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18 pdr shell

New posts. Search forums. JavaScript is disabled. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Thread starter ljones Start date 31 Jan I have a brass WW1 shell. It has many markings on the base. I have no idea what any mean apart from a big mark on the bottom which I guess is the year. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Here is a photo:. Helm MIA Moderator. Book Reviewer. No expert but would the 18Pr mean 18 pounder? Ravers LE Kit Reviewer.Descriptions of solid shot for smoothbore guns Caliber designation Bore Diameter in inches Diameter of shot in inches Weight in pounds Shot Weight in pounds Shell Mean weight in pounds Case shot 1-Pdr.

Descriptions of solid iron balls used in stands of grape Caliber designation Allowable diameters in inches Mean weight in pounds Pdr. Gun 1.

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Mountain Howitzer. Field Howitzer 1. Howitzer 1. Gun 2. Gun 3. Gun 4. Gun 5. Gun 6. Gun 7. Smooth-bore gun Howitzer Rifle-guns Hotchkiss pounder, bronze pounder mountain-howitzer. Diameter of bottom Diameter of bottom of cone.

18 pdr shell

Rings, diameter, exterior. Weight of projectiles, strapped. Shell and case loaded. Interior diameter. Diameter of plates Thickness of top plate. Thickness of bottom plate. Number of Shot. Fixed Ammunition. Whole length. Number of primers. United States Ordnance Manual printed in Descriptions of solid shot for smoothbore guns.

Caliber designation.

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Bore Diameter in inches. Diameter of shot in inches. Weight in pounds Shot. Weight in pounds Shell.By downloading or embedding any media, you agree to the terms and conditions of the IWM Non Commercial Licenceincluding your use of the attribution statement specified by IWM.

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Close Use this image under Non-Commercial licence. First World War period British pounder shrapnel round, of the type used in the unsuccessful attempt to cut the German barbed wire before the Battle of the Somme in It required great skill to determine the precise setting for the fuze, so that the shell burst at the correct height to destroy the dense barbed wire entanglements.

Show more. Object associations Associated people and organisations.

18-Pounder Artillery Shells: The Great War Recycled and Re-Circulated

British Army. Associated themes. British Army Related objects. Related content. Share this Share on twitter Share on facebook.It formed the backbone of the Royal Field Artillery during the war, and was produced in large numbers.

It was used by British Forces in all the main theatres, and by British troops in Russia in It was generally horse drawn until mechanisation in the s. The first versions were introduced in Later versions remained in service with British forces until early During the interwar periodthe pounder was developed into the early versions of the equally famous Ordnance QF pounderwhich would form the basis of the British artillery forces during and after the Second World War in much the same fashion as the pounder had during First.

During the Second Boer Warthe British government realised that its field artillery was being overtaken by the more modern "quick-firing" guns of other major powers, and investigated replacements for its existing field gun, the BL pounder 7 cwt. InGeneral Sir Henry Brackenburythe then director-general of ordnance, sent officers to visit European gun makers. At the same time, the British Cabinet ordered Field Marshal Lord Robertsthe Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, to send home artillery brigade and battery commanders "selected for their eminence and experience" to form an Equipment Committee.

British gun manufacturers were invited to propose designs. Of the many entries, five for the horse artillery gun and three for the field gun were selected and their makers invited to submit a "specimen". These were tested inbut none was found suitable for service although they all had good features. The makers were called to a conference and agreed to collaborate to produce a composite design. This used the Armstrong gun, Vickers ' recoil system, and Royal Ordnance Factory 's sighting and elevating gear and ammunition carrying.

Reduced wheel size from 5feet to 4feet was also accepted it had been a matter the Equipment Committee had to investigate which saved weight. Four Artillery batteries of the composite design took part in trials of inand the new pounder design was accepted.

The pounder was used on all fronts during the First World War.

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It remained in service during the inter-war period. The pounder was a quick-firing horse-drawn field gun designed to be towed behind a limber and six horses. The gun barrel was wire-wound nickel-steel with a single-motion screw breech with a cartridge extractor. It fired a fixed round of shell and cartridge fixed together, which was known as "quick firing" in British terminology. The lower carriage comprised a single hollow steel trail fixed to the centre of the axle-tree.

The limited traverse saddle supported the elevating mass and a shield. Traverse controls were on the left and elevation on the right of the saddle.

Recoil was by a hydraulic buffer with telescopic running-up springs to return the barrel to its firing position. The Equipment Committee's conditions required tangent sights i. However, the pounder entered service with rocking bar also called "bar and drum" sights — open sights with the option of a telescope on the left and a range scale in yards on the right of the cradle.

These arrangements also incorporated independent line of sight, meaning that the sights could remain laid on the target while the barrel was elevated or depressed.It formed the backbone of the Royal Field Artillery during the war, and was produced in large numbers. It was used by British and Empire Forces in all the main theatres, and by British troops in Russia in It was generally horse drawn until mechanisation in the s.

The first versions were introduced in and later versions remained in service with British forces until early During the interwar period the pounder formed the basis of early versions of the equally famous Ordnance QF 25 pounderwhich would form the basis of the British artillery forces during and after World War IIin much the same fashion as the pounder had during World War I.

During the Second Boer War the British government realised its field artillery was being overtaken by more modern "quick firing" guns of other major powers, and investigated replacements for its existing field gun, the BL 15 pounder 7 cwt. At the same time,the British Cabinet ordered Field Marshal Lord Robertsthe Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, to send home artillery brigade and battery commanders "selected for their eminence and experience" to form an Equipment Committee.

British gun manufacturers were invited to propose designs. Of the many entries, five for the horse artillery gun and three for the field gun were selected and their makers invited to submit a "specimen". These were tested inbut none were found suitable for service although they all had good features.

The makers were called to a conference and agreed to collaborate to produce a composite design. This used the Armstrong gun, Vickers ' recoil system, and Royal Ordnance Factory 's sighting and elevating gear and ammunition carrying. Four Artillery batteries of the composite design took part in trials of inand the new pounder design was accepted. The pounder was used on all fronts during the First World War. It remained in service during the inter-war period.

The pounder was a quick-firing horse-drawn field gun designed to be towed behind a limber and six horses. The gun barrel was wire bound nickel-steel with a single-motion screw breech with a cartridge extractor.

The Restoration of an 18-pounder Field Gun

It fired a fixed round of shell and cartridge fixed together, which was known as "quick firing" in British terminology. The lower carriage comprised a single hollow steel trail fixed to the centre of the axle-tree. The limited traverse saddle supported the elevating mass and a shield. Traverse controls were on the left and elevation on the right of the saddle.

Recoil was by a hydraulic buffer with telescopic running-up springs to return the barrel to its firing position. The Equipment Committee's conditions required tangent sights i. However, the pounder entered service with rocking bar also called "bar and drum" sights - open sights with the option of a telescope on the left and a range scale in yards on the right of the cradle. These arrangements also incorporated independent line of sight, meaning that the sights could remain laid on the target while the barrel was elevated or depressed.

A clinometer was provided for indirect fire when the sight was aimed using a gun-arc a refined version of the expedient devices used in South Africa and aiming posts in line horizontally with the target. However, in indirect fire goniometric sights were adopted, consisting of an alidade mounted on a circular scale graduated in degrees that was mounted on the shield. In the Number 3 Dial Sight, a refined version with a telescope and compass, replaced the goniometer.

The rocking bar and telescope were retained for direct fire, as was the range scale on the right in spite of a clinometer being part of the Dial Sight mount.

Inafter three years of trials, the German Goertz panoramic sight was selected as the Number 7 Dial Sight. This, with its sight mount that again included a sight clinometer, replaced the No 3. However, resolving various issues, notably with the sight and mount carrying case mounted on the shield, meant that the Number 7 sight did not enter service until early in Unusually for a 20th-century British gun, the pounder retained two man laying throughout its life, elevation in yards was set on a range scale on the righthand side of the cradle.

The Equipment Committee had also insisted on better methods of fuze setting, important because until late in it only had time fuzed ammunition. A hand held mechanical fuze setter was developed, and in early a "fuze indicator" was introduced, this converted the range into a fuse setting. The original short recuperator of Mk I carriage, above the barrel.

The recuperator was wound with thick rope for protection. The Ordnance Quick Firing pounder Mark I gun barrel was wire-wound for one-third of its length, chosen as it was lighter, stronger and cheaper to manufacture than a fully built-up barrel. The narrow single-pole trail design of the Carriages Mk I and II were suited to towing by teams of horses, but constrained downward motion of the breech, and thus limited the gun's range to yards in normal use. The range could be increased to yards by "digging in" the end of the pole trail to increase elevation.By Roger H, 10 Augustin Arms and other weapons.

Canadian 18 Pr. Catherine's, Ontario MDCo in The three letter code IQW? The Broad Arrow within "C" is the Canadian government property mark.

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The No. Blimey Tony. You don't know the name of the person who filled it with cordite by any chance?! Williamson's Guide notes that the Filling Station Monogram 'K' denotes Kingston, Canada - could this be more in keeping with the fact that this is a Canadian shell case?

Many of the Canadian shell cases were delivered to the UK empty and were filled here either by private contractors such as Kynoch or government facilities like the National Filling Factories.

Does Mr. Wiliamson give any indication what or who "Kingston" is? For example, is it a company, government facility or place? I have not come across it before, but that does not mean a lot!

There is no "Kingston" in my Min.

18 pdr shell

Wiliamson cites the list of Filling Station Monograms in which it appears as being taken from "The Marking of Ammunition " - unfortunately there is nothing further by way of a clue as to what or where Kingston is - the list is a mix of countries and places - that said there is an Armoury now a military museum in Kingston Ontario.

These are not filling stations, and nowhere does the manual give them that title. They are ammunition stations or issuing depots and the initials would be found on ammunition packaging or possibly re-packs and the like. An example in that list is Woolwich, which as a depot has the monogram "W", but the Royal Arsenal that actually filled ammunition used the monogram "RL". A number of them are naval ammunition depots also, for example Pembroke, Priddy's Hard, Portsmouth, Crombie for Rosyth etc.

I have asked this question before but not had a satisfactory answer, the markings are for shell filling stations stamped on shells, the markings we always talk about are case markings, so were they filled at the same stations and marked the same way? I have a case marked KY which isn't on the list.

Personally I have never seen the majority of those marks, and I have handled more than a few. It is a intriguing question. Shell filling was not a simple task by then. Was there really a shell filling station in Hyde Park? I can understand an ammunition depot as once filled but not fuzed shells are fairly safe, but a factory with large quantities of free explosive?


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